Digital Mappa

Digital Mappa (DM) is an open-access, browser-based digital humanities platform for your own workspaces, projects, collaborations, and scholarly publications of digital images and texts.

The premise of DM is simple: if you have a collection of digital images and texts, then you should be able to create a project where you can link together specific moments on these images and texts, annotate these moments as much as you want, generate searchable content, collaborate with your friends, and publish your work online for others to see and share.

Oh, and you should be able to do all of this with as little technical expertise as possible. If you can click, drag, copy, paste, and type, then you can do this; it’s a digital humanities platform built… for the rest of us.

DM joined CHPDC in 2016, and thanks to a multiyear UW2020 grant from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation in 2017, DM 1.o (a beta version of the platform) arrived on campus at UW in spring of 2018. DM 2.0 is expected in fall of 2019. Learn more about us on our website and follow us on Twitter for updates.

The UW instance of DM (2.0) is currently available for use by the UW community, and is already being used by dozens of faculty, graduate students and undergraduates. If you have a question about the platform on campus and/or would like to get started using DM, then reach out to our research assistant Maxwell Gray who you can find here.

Here is some of what people are already doing on campus:

  • The Old English Poetry in Facsimile Project | digital editions of Old English poetry in manuscript facsimile | https://uw.digitalmappa.org/58
  • Ezra Pound’s “The Music of Beowulf” | a digital critical edition of an essay of the modernist poet on the “music” of the Old English epic poem | https://uw.digitalmappa.org/57
  • Virtual Mappa | a dozen early medieval maps of the world, thousands of annotations | the project that started it all | a DM 1.0 project | http://sims.digitalmappa.org/workspace/#965fe731
  • Library of Stains | if these manuscript stains could talk? well now, they can, thanks to Labeculae Vivae | a DM 1.0 project | http://app.digitalmappa.org/workspace/#beptu0pz
  • van Suppé’s “Trip to Africa” | a digital student edition of the opening scene of the most popular late nineteenth-century American operetta | featuring materials from the Tams-Witmark collection on campus | forthcoming
  • George Moses Horton Project | a newly-discovered essay by the nineteenth-century enslaved African-American poet | forthcoming